Overjustification Effect

A great article talking about how our internal narratives of intrinsically motivated behavior is adulterated with extrinsic factors…. 

"They then divided the children into three groups. They offered Group A a glittering certificate of awesomeness if the artists drew during the next fun time. They offered Group B nothing, but if the kids in Group B happened to draw they received an unexpected certificate of awesomeness identical to the one received by Group A. The experimenters told Group C nothing ahead of time, and later the scientists didn’t award a prize if those children went for the colored pencils and markers. The scientists then watched to see how the kids performed during a series of playtimes over three days. They awarded the prizes, stopped observations, and waited two weeks. When they returned, the researchers watched as the children faced the same the choice as before the experiment began. Three groups, three experiences, many fun activities – how do you think their feelings changed?

Well, Group B and Group C didn’t change at all. They went to the art supplies and created monsters and mountains and houses with curly-cue smoke streams crawling out of rectangular chimneys with just as much joy as they had before they met the psychologists. Group A, though, did not. They were different people now. The children in Group A “spent significantly less time” drawing than did the others, and they “showed a significant decrease in interest in the activity” as compared to before the experiment. Why?

The children in Group A were swept up, overpowered, their joy perverted by the overjustification effect. The story they told themselves wasn’t the same story the other groups were telling. That’s how the effect works.”

Via The Browser - http://youarenotsosmart.com/2011/12/14/the-overjustification-effect/

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I have a new book coming out soon, Launching the Innovation Renaissance, more on that later. Here is one bit drawn from the book and a recent op-ed in IBD.

Educated people have higher wages and…

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test3

sorry for all the tests… getting all my accounts reset

Real posts soon!

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test2

test2

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These are really great, about a man whose legacy is cemented as world-changing.

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The Breakfast Club The Illusion (Illusion of Asymmetric Insight)

Studies have shown that individuals (and groups) significantly overestimate what they know about other people (or other groups). This is a subject that, if we’re honest with ourselves, is more prevalent than we’d like to believe, and helps add some depth to the concept of in-group/out-group bias.  

The illusion of asymmetric insight makes it seem as though you know everyone else far better than they know you, and not only that, but you know them better than they know themselves. You believe the same thing about groups of which you are a member. As a whole, your group understands outsiders better than outsiders understand your group, and you understand the group better than its members know the group to which they belong.

http://youarenotsosmart.com/2011/08/21/the-illusion-of-asymmetric-insight/

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The case against doing crunches:

No one needs to perform hundreds or even dozens of crunches, said Brad Schoenfeld, a professor of exercise science at Lehman College in the Bronx and an author of…

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Be more creative by stopping thought

New research by Dan Goleman, of Emotional Intelligence fame.   This helps to explain why we get those great ideas at such random times.

Step one, you define and frame the problem. Many people say that one of the signs of geniuses in a field is the ability to see problems and challenges and ask questions that no one else sees or asks. So first find and frame the creative challenge.

Second, immerse yourself, dig deep. Gather ideas, data, information, anything that’s going to help you with a creative breakthrough.

The third phase is a little counter-intuitive for some people: let it all go. Just relax. The best ideas come while you’re taking a long hot shower, going for a walk, or on vacation. Here, the self-mastery comes in knowing when to let go, and knowing that you need to let go.

The final stage, the fourth, is execution - and, of course, many brilliant ideas fail here, because they aren’t implemented well.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-brain-and-emotional-intelligence/201108/new-insights-the-creative-brain

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